Sunday, November 9, 2014

Lights in Lapland

Lapland’s biggest attraction

One of the elements which provides a year-round draw to Lapland is simply its natural light. It is unique. It is breathtaking. And the best of all, it is completely free to enjoy. At whatever part of the year you choose to travel to Lapland, you will witness natural phenomena which will provide a lasting memory. It is a haven with photographic opportunities, both for amateurs and professionals. There where the sun never sets in the summertime, the northern lights color the dark winter evenings. Lapland, a land of extremes. Extremely beautiful.

At this time of the year, in the summer, above the polar circle, the sun doesn’t set. The earth’s axis positions the North Pole towards the sun, which is called the northern summer solstice. This means 24-hour daylight and a great many opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts who want to stay out late. No flashlights needed! Midsummer (around the 21st of June) marks the start of a period with midnight sun and is traditionally celebrated with festivities throughout Lapland. 

Midnight sun near Bodø, Norway

No sunset in the summer, but an endless sunset in December, when the sun does not rise above the horizon. This causes a special effect of a warm, pinkish glow on the white snow, which is also known as ‘Kaamos’.

Kaamos light over Finnish Lapland

From September to April the Aurora Borealis makes its entry in the night sky. The Aurora is a spectacle of dancing green lights, an explosion of colors and motion. It is caused by solar eruptions that launch large quantities of energetically charged particles into space. As these particles approach the Earth, they are pulled in by the magnetic field, and drawn towards the magnetic poles. In the upper layers of the atmosphere - 50 to 65 miles above the Earth - the charged particles collide with oxygen and nitrogen atoms, and release their energy. A powerful natural process causing the magical northern lights.  

Northern lights in Abisko area, Sweden
Do you wish to go and see the lights with your own eyes? Abisko Aurora is a travel agent which specializes solely in northern lights holidays to Lapland.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Top 5 reasons to spend your vacation in Abisko in Wintertime

Spot the northern lights

Naturally, Abisko is the best spot in the world for northern lights observation. Watch the aurora forecast, or book a northern lights excursion, and you will probably be rewarded with one of nature’s most spectacular powers. The patch of sky over the Abisko lake remains clear despite overcast weather in surrounding areas. Excellent for observing the green, red and purple curtains dancing in the starry sky.

Try snowshoeing through the wilderness

The Abisko National Park, Lake Törneträsk, the mountains, all offer good trails for a snowshoeing experience. Snowshoeing is in fact hiking, wearing special shoes under your boots for trudging through tonnes of compact snow. Thanks to the snowshoes, you won’t sink into the deep snow, which makes walking much nicer.

Go snowmobiling through the mountains

Off the beaten track, into the wild. The Abisko mountains are the perfect surroundings for an exciting snowmobile adventure. These machines are quite easy to navigate, and don’t require the level of endurance that skiing or snowshoeing demand. A snowmobile definitely makes going uphill to a mountain top or remote cabin a lot more comfortable, and you are still being rewarded with the magnificent views. This turns snowmobiles into the perfect means of transport to enjoy the natural beauty of the Abisko area.

Catch fish from frozen lakes

If you have never gone fishing before, ice fishing will be an intense introduction! Drill a hole in  a frozen lake to catch an Arctic char, salmon, pike, perch, or whitefish.
Traditionally, once you drill a hole in the ice large enough for your bait, you make yourself comfortable on a reindeer skin. Through the hole you can see the crystal clear water, your bait and maybe an eager fish swimming by.
The enormous Lake Törneträsk doesn’t only have plenty of fish to offer, the view from the Lake is remarkable. Surrounded by mountain ranges, you feel quite small standing in the middle of the 70 kilometers long lake. And this is only the seventh largest lake from Sweden! While fishing, you can also admire the Lapporten high above Abisko.

Drive a husky sled

This is probably the most exciting activity in the Arctic North. The interaction with the animals is refreshing, and on a sled you feel very close to nature.

Many companies run dog sledding tours, from daytrips to multi-day expeditions, it’s all possible. In Abisko, the half day husky tour from the Abisko Mountain Station is a good introduction to husky sledding. 

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Northern lights observation in Sweden

The essentials for northern lights observation: darkness, cold, and clear skies.
Where do you find this? In Sweden!

Especially above the Polar Circle, northern lights are frequently observed in Sweden between September and April. The best time of the year are the winter months, when the nights are very cold and the skies are clear. Around the time of the month when there is no moonlight, the skies are darkest, giving full stage to the aurora. But also when the aurora appears around full moon, the night show is amazing. The key is to get away from the city lights, which pollute the sky. Head out into the wilderness! The strongest light show is usually between 22-23pm.

Dress up warmly, brave the cold, and hunt the northern lights in these top locations in Swedish Lapland.

Abisko National Park

Located about 100 kilometers north of Kiruna, this is the very best spot for northern lights observations. It’s scientifically proven that the sky above Lake Törnetrask remain clear more often, despite cloudy weather in the surroundings. Thanks to this microclimate, chances of seeing the northern lights are higher in Abisko than anywhere else in the world.

Some interesting activities make a visit to Abisko even more worthy. You can go up the mountains by cable car to the Aurora Sky Station. The view over the lake and the Lapporten is amazing, and it’s the perfect vista point for the aurora.

The Torne River area

For example the village of Jukkasjärvi, at the border of Lapland’s largest river Torne, is an excellent place. Besides, Jukkasjärvi hosts the world’s famous ICEhotel. You can head out on husky sleds or snowmobiles on a northern lights hunt, or dine at a wilderness camp under the dancing green lights.

Other spots on the Torne River are Nikkaluokta and Vittangi. Lodging opportunities are a bit more complicated or less comfortable, but for northern lights observations you’re in the right place.

The inland Gällivare area

This is the heart of Lapland, very isolated and in the middle of the wilderness. The little number of villages and inhabitants make sure that there is no light pollution, and the large number of frozen lakes enable plenty of good spots with an open view at the sky, even in the middle of the forests. Luckily there are some comfortable, small-scale wilderness lodges where you enjoy a relaxing holiday. During the day, husky sledding and snowmobiling over the deserted taiga landscapes is an interesting pastime, while in the evening northern lights are the main theme.

No idea what to expect of a wilderness Lodge? A good example is the Pinetree Lodge, which can be booked through

Good luck northern lights hunting